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Travel Pictures - TANZANIA - 1999

All images Ron Miller

       Tanzania may be the African nation that best embodies the Africa of our imagination, as it has exquisite game parks in addition to the continent's highest peak - Kilimanjaro. Tanzania also includes the fascinating island of Zanzibar where visitors can relax on tropical beaches as well as experience the appalling history of the slave trade. The parks I visited included Tarangire, Lake Manyara, Ngorongoro Crater, and Serengeti. Unlike many of the more managed game parks in Africa, the Tanzanian parks are truly wild and offer an authentic, African wildlife experience.

A drive-through window for trains? Villagers selling food at a rural train stop -
Southern Tanzania

Tanzania's capital sits on the coast of the Indian Ocean where the heat and humidity can be oppressive. This diverse city is home to
an interesting mix of cultures and has an overall unhurried feel about it. Although Dar es Salaam has character, it also has
the appearance of a city that was built in 1950 with regular maintenance ending shortly thereafter -
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Approaching the spice island's largest city, Stone Town, on the ferry from Dar es Salaam -
Zanzibar, Tanzania
The waterfront really comes alive in the late afternoon -
Stone Town; Zanzibar, Tanzania
Zanzibar's main city, Stone Town, has narrow, cobbled streets and 300-year-old buildings sporting ornate multi-level verandas
and carved wooden doors. Zanzibar, also known as the "Spice Island," has for centuries been the center of trade
in East Africa for exotic spices, ivory, and even slaves -
Stone Town; Zanzibar, Tanzania
One of the many carved wooden doors in the old city -
Stone Town; Zanzibar, Tanzania
This group of African dhows plying the Indian Ocean seem to mirror Africa's economy;
of the seven boats, one is active, five are underemployed, and one is "retired" -
Stone Town; Zanzibar, Tanzania
A flotilla of outrigger canoes are beached on Zanzibar's gulf side -
Zanzibar, Tanzania
A touching memorial to the slaves who were auctioned off at this very location. Historically, Zanzibar was a focal point for the East African
slave trade, and within Stone Town is the site of the former slave market. Africans from the mainland were brought to Zanzibar in neck
chains where they were held in underground chambers before being auctioned off like cattle. Many died from disease and exhaustion,
but this was considered to be merely a weeding-out process so that only the strongest slaves would be brought to market -
Stone Town; Zanzibar, Tanzania
In what may be the very best example of positive cultural change, this Anglican church was constructed in 1877 upon the very courtyard
where slaves were previously auctioned off. In fact, the interior altar is located adjacent to a circular piece of marble
that marks the exact spot of the former whipping post -
Stone Town; Zanzibar, Tanzania
 Hazy sunset from my hotel lobby -
Stone Town; Zanzibar, Tanzania
Entertaining sign at the YMCA -
Moshi, Tanzania
The roof of Africa, Mt. Kilimanjaro, reflected in the YMCA swimming pool -
Moshi, Tanzania
Close-up view of the dwindling glaciers on the 19,330 foot summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro -
Moshi, Tanzania
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A rare stretch of pavement in the otherwise dusty streets of the world's capital for both safari companies
and unbelievably persistent safari company peddlers (a.k.a. "flycatchers") -
Arusha, Tanzania
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Mom has found temporary sanctuary from malaria-carrying mosquitoes -
Arusha, Tanzania
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Because there are lions in the area, I hurriedly snapped this photo of our battered
and sputtering Land Rover just as we crested the Ngorongoro's crater rim -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
Tasty fruits and hand-woven baskets for sale at a tourist stop -
near Tarangire N.P., Tanzania
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Two African elephants foraging around the bloated trunk of a baobab tree -
Tarangire N.P., Tanzania
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This lone giraffe has found valuable shade in the "forest" -
Tarangire N.P., Tanzania
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Zebra showing off their stripes at a watering hole. The zebras' stripes are believed to have multiple benefits. First of all, when a lion attacks
a herd, the plethora of stripes makes it more difficult for a predator to distinguish one animal from another. The stripes on their rear ends
are all horizontal and, in a mass of fleeing zebra, the net effect would be a multitude of stripes that appear to run together.
Another possible benefit of the striping is temperature regulation as the extreme difference in heat absorption
between the black and white hair may create air movement next to the animal's skin to aid in cooling -
Tarangire N.P., Tanzania
BrianKMiller.com
A "big bend" in the river. The giraffe will never keep its head down for too long - even while drinking. This is because the extreme change in
blood pressure would burst the blood vessels in the brain. The giraffe has valves in the veins and blood vessels of the neck to constrict blood flow
to the brain when the head is lowered so that the giraffe can safely take a drink. However, should a lion attack and the giraffe need to raise its head quickly, a sponge-like device near the base of the brain will provide a continuous supply of oxygenated blood so that the animal does not pass out! -
Tarangire N.P., Tanzania
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Vista of Lake Manyara from the Rift Valley escarpment. What might appear as a Garden of Eden might be more accurately
called a "Garden of Feedin'" due to the large mammals - including predators - that inhabit this park -
Tarangire N.P., Tanzania
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Mom peeking from her tent just before sunrise atop the rim of the caldera -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
Sunrise view from the tent camp on the crater rim -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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Overlook of the Ngorongoro Crater's caldera. The 2,001-foot-deep crater was formed when a giant volcano
(estimated to be feet 15,000 to 19,000 feet in height) exploded a long, long time ago. Approximately 25,000
large mammals live within the crater including Africa's highest density of mammalian predators -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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Another view of Ngorongoro's crater that is more than 10 miles across -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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Descending into the caldera -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
Masai children hoping for a handout (or compensation for a photo) at a popular overlook -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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Masai herdsman with goats (zebra in the distance). The Ngorongoro Crater is the only Tanzanian park that is multi-use in that it
protects the wildlife while allowing human habitation and farming - although only at subsistence levels -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
BrianKMiller.com
These Masai warriors were on high alert for any cameras pointed in their direction, and it was a challenge to sneak a photo without
paying them money. We became more than a little uneasy when this group rushed toward our safari vehicle with fingers pointed
at my brother's huge telephoto lens. They accused Brian of sneaking unauthorized photos and demanded payment -
a request that was quickly honored because ... well, they all carried spears! -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
Official, authorized photo of tranquil Masai warriors posing with their
pointed negotiation tools and a little extra money in their pockets -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania 
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Pink flamingos foraging in the soda lake at the crater bottom -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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This bull elephant is foraging among the few trees at the crater bottom -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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Close-up of a lone bull elephant. Using its tusks and powerful trunk, this elephant was able to snap stout branches as though they were
mere twigs. The sharp cracking sounds of the breaking branches echoed across the crater like gunshots. With the engine shut off, even
the munching of bark was clearly audible. Most elephants do not die form predators but from starvation after they no longer produce
replacement teeth. An unwavering truth in the world, for all animals, is that life is a constant struggle against the alternative -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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Vista out to the vast expanse of the Serengeti from the outer slopes of the Ngorongoro Crater -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania

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Mom, Me, and Brian above the Serengeti's vast grasslands that, in the dry season, resemble a brown ocean -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
This pride of lions was lounging just a few hundred yards from the visitor center and walking trails! -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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The lions' view of their grocery store. This herd of impala is grazing around a rock outcrop, known in Africa as a kopje -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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Sunrise at the hippo pool (swim at your own risk!) -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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Another daredevil's swimming pool - if the hippos do not get you, the crocodiles (near the rocks) would probably step in -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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This elephant was checking out the new visitors by smelling through its trunk-
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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Charge! The elephants did not appreciate our vehicle parked so near to them, and this perturbed pachyderm, with ears flared to look
even more intimidating, charged our jeep. It was thrilling to try and anticipate each charge by the subtle changes in their body language.
The elephants slowly worked up a fury, usually swaying side to side with accentuated trunk movements just before each charge.
Although the consequences of a charge can be deadly, we could not seem to contain
our laughter - that is, only after realizing that the charge was a bluff! -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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A mating pair of lions -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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The mass migration of zebra and wildebeest on the African plains -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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A close-up of the migratory herd including a helpless, orphaned wildebeest at left. The young wildebeest with its tiny, undersized body and long,
spidery legs, looks more like Bambi than a homely, adult wildebeest. Sadly, the youngster continually approached the other animals in a
desperate attempt to locate its mother. The other animals showed no sympathy, as the wildebeests lowered their heads in an attempt to
gore the helpless orphan while the zebra kicked at it with their hind legs. The herd animals instinctively try
to kill orphans, as their eventual weakened condition will attract predators -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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You can't see this at the zoo. All of the commotion around the orphaned wildebeest
has attracted the attention of this collared lioness -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
The lion charges the young wildebeest as the herd flees -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
This orphaned wildebeest never had a chance. Strangely, this wildlife drama took place among a half-dozen safari vehicles.
The animals practically ignore the vehicles as if they are part of the natural environment. In fact, because the animals
have been around tourist vehicles all of their lives, they are perceived as nothing more than metal, moving bushes -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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As the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu stated, "Nature is not human hearted" -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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These zebra lookouts, staring and barking at the nearby predators, are refusing the lions' dinner invitation -
Serengeti N.P., Tanzania
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This group of lions, lying nearby in the relative coolness of a creek bed, is the object of attention for the zebra lookouts -
Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
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The 14,980-foot Mt. Meru, an active volcano, towers above the savannah about 44 miles west of Kilimanjaro -
Arusha N.P., Tanzania
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The wild animals were not the only hazards during our walking safari! -
Arusha N.P., Tanzania
The cape buffalos are the most dangerous animals for those on a foot safari (there are no lions in the park ... usually!) -
Arusha N.P., Tanzania
Would a single rifle really provide protection during a stampede of cape buffalo? Approaching the animals
without the safe confines of a vehicle was an entirely different experience -
Arusha N.P., Tanzania
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Brian and mom approaching four gentle giants (gentle as long as one does not get too close!) -
Arusha N.P., Tanzania
You are not hallucinating! This timely photograph was taken as a herd of giraffe traversed a hill top.
The map referred to this area as long-neck ridge, but we couldn't figure out why -
Arusha N.P., Tanzania
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More gentle giants as we walk along with the safely of our guides -
Arusha N.P., Tanzania
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All images Ron Miller
For authorized use of these photos, please contact Ron Miller at TheHappyCannibal@gmail.com